My research interests focus on the use of orbital radar observations to study the geology of planetary surfaces, with a particular focus on processes related to impact cratering. Radar represents the best way to observe the surface of planets with large opaque atmospheres, such as Venus and Saturn’s moon Titan, leading to a better understanding of their surface morphology. It also provides a wealth of information about the physical properties of the surface being imaged, revealing features not easily seen with optical data alone.

To pursue my interest in planetary radar, I am involved in several spacecraft missions. I was a member of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter’s (LRO) Mini-RF science team, and an associate member of the Cassini RADAR team, which continues to provide the highest resolution views of Titan’s surface.

Download my complete CV here.

Neish Lab 2016 Neish Lab at Escape London (December 2016)

Education

  • Ph.D., Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona (Aug. 2004 - Dec. 2008)

  • B.Sc., Combined Honours Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia (Sept. 1999 - May 2004)

Work Experience

  • Assistant Professor

    Department of Earth Sciences, The University of Western Ontario (July 2015 - present)

  • Assistant Professor

    Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology (August 2013 - June 2015)

  • NASA Postdoctoral Fellow

    Goddard Space Flight Center (July 2012 - July 2013)

  • Postdoctoral Fellow

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (May 2009 - June 2012)

Currently Funded Grant Proposals

Aug 2013 - July 2016

Erosion on Titan as revealed by its crater population*
NASA’s Outer Planets Research Program
$232,697

Awards

  • AGU Ron Greeley Award, 2014

  • NASA Postdoctoral Fellowship, 2012

  • NASA Group Achievement Award to the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Team, 2010

  • NSERC Postgraduate Scholarship - Doctoral, 2005-2008

  • Julie Payette-NSERC Research Scholarship, 2004-2005

Professional Affiliations

  • American Geophysical Union
  • Division for Planetary Science, American Astronomical Society